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LIVE LONGER, GET BACK TO SCHOOL

By Debra Yearwood

Research shows that lifelong learning has numerous positive effects on our lives. It is as important to our health as exercise and good food. In fact, life long learning is considered to be so valuable that the federal government has proposed a $250 annual' re-skilling and continued learning' tax credit to those between the ages of 25 and 64 who earn between $10,000 and $150,000. The  benefit is scheduled to come into effect in 2020.

If you're interested in taking a course but not sure where to start, or don't want to spend a lot of money, check out this month's blog for tips on free or low-cost courses.

READ MORE HERE
FINDING INSPIRATION:
AN INTERVIEW WITH LAUREL CRAIB

Inspiration can come in many forms, you just have to look for it. Listen as Laurel Craib shares how she finds inspiration.
Laurèl Craib attended Top Sixty Over Sixty's workshop,  Inspiration, at the Ottawa Gallery and shares some of her personal insights on finding inspiration at any age.
AGEING WELL
Could a 'tickle' a day keep the doctor away?
A small electric "tickle" to the ear may affect the body's nervous system. British researchers claim this can promote overall well-being and may potentially slow down some effects of ageing.
IN THE NEWS

Keeping older employees engaged and at work

A new research paper published in A-ranked journal Personnel Review has identified the factors most likely to keep older employees engaged and in the workforce.
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Ratio of Younger, Older Workers at Parity: StatsCan

As of 2018, there was one Canadian worker over the age of 55 for every worker between the ages of 25 and 34, according to a new report by Statistics Canada.
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As Job Market Slows, Risks For Older Workers Loom Large

Forbes: The labour market is slowing. The trade wars are taking their toll on business investment, on economic growth and on hiring. Policymakers at the Fed are worried enough about the economy to cut their key interest rate for the first time in more than a decade. Older workers – those 55 years old and older – need the labour market growth to continue and are particularly vulnerable if the labour market slows further.  
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Retirement can be boring but working keeps you stimulated
For decades he had worked in logistics and for transport companies, and as an active 72-year-old felt it would be a shame not to put his years of experience to good use.
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Top Sixty Over Sixty · 3551 Stonecrest Road · Woodlawn, On K0A 3M0 · Canada

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