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Dear friends, 

Thank you for joining me again this week and if you’re a new subscriber – welcome! This week I write to you from Atlanta. 🇺🇸

Women & The World is a newsletter powered by Love; love for meaningful connection, love for progress and celebration, and love that sheds light on the beautiful things happening in our world. Combine this love with a Hope to inspire, and that's how my weekly message to you begins.
  
I’d love to hear your feedback and ideas for my future newsletters, and please consider sharing with your friends using the link below.
 

with love & light,
Jasmine
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Something Informative

We could all use a healthy dose of optimism, so let's see what was good in the world last week.

🦋The Kenyan beauty parlour serving female heroin users: Naima Said was a heroin user for 10 years. After her father ran out of money to pay for private school, she was at a loose end, she says. By 21, she was a “full=blown” heroin addict. But almost a decade later, at 31, Said founded the Beauty Corner – a small but perfectly formed parlour in Mombasa on the Kenyan coast. Every weekday at 8am, she lays out her equipment and waits for women to walk through the door. Like Said, those who seek out her services are addicted to heroin, or in recovery. The aim was to get women through the door and to make them feel special – even for a short while – before bringing up other, more difficult issues. It seems to be working. In under a year, 453 women have come to the parlour, and there has been a big uptake of women using the clinical services. “I say to them: ‘What you see on the outside is drug addiction, and self-loathing. You are beautiful. You’re a mother, a daughter, a sister.’ As I paint their nails, I say, ‘why don’t you start methadone? Why don’t you check your [HIV] status?’ When it works, it’s like magic.” Full Story 

💌9 women who clerked for Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on her enduring example, in honour of her birthday: In a word, law clerks are interns. But their responsibilities include doing some of the most consequential administrative work in the nation. Clerks read petitions and recommend cases to the justices. Some author draft opinions. Others serve as sounding boards—testing out possible arguments with their boss. Four members of the current Supreme Court were clerks themselves. Ruth Bader Ginsburg is one of the longest-serving justices, which means she has recruited more clerks than perhaps a single other justice. A significant portion of them have been women, nine of which shared their reflections on their time with the Notorious RBG. Full Story

⚽️All the updates you need on the US Women’s Soccer team’s case for Equal Pay: Embroiled in a lawsuit over equal pay, lawyers for the US Women’s National Team (USWNT) employer argued in a court filing this week that women athletes are less skilled and work less demanding jobs than their male counterparts. The filing was part of US Soccer’s attempt to prove that it has not discriminated against the World Cup champion team based on their gender. Court documents filed in the equal pay trial, which captivated the country last summer after the USWNT won its fourth World Cup title in France, show US Soccer lawyers arguing that, under the Equal Pay Act, “The job of a [men’s national team player] carries more responsibility within US Soccer than the job of a [women’s national team] player.” US Soccer also pointed to biological differences and “indisputable science” to argue that women should be paid less because the men’s team “requires a higher level of skill” than the women’s team. The federation’s lawyers grilled women’s national team stars like Carli Lloyd and Alex Morgan over the fact that they were not as strong or fast as players on the men’s team. “Do you think that the team could be competitive against the senior men’s national team?” a US Soccer lawyer asked Lloyd, according to documents filed last month. “I’m not sure,” Lloyd said. “Shall we fight it out to see who wins and then we get paid more?” Full Story 

Something Practical

A few opportunities and projects that caught my eye. 


🇮🇹

Internet // Milan // Public policy intern at Amazon - Details 
NGO // Florence // Community manager at Treedom - Details 
Travel // Milan // Business analyst at Airbnb - Details 
Internet // Milan // Partner manager at Pintrest - Details 
Internet // Milan // Writer at Hootsuite - Details 
NGO // Rome // Translator at FAO - Details 
Media // Rome // Coordinator at Netflix - Details 
Fashion // Milan // Communications at Gucci - Details 
Internet // Milan // Data analyst at Bending Spoons - Details

 
🇺🇸

Publishing // NYC // Staff editor at NYTimes - Details  
Media // Atlanta // Writer at CNN - Details 
Internet // Sunnyvale // Writer at LinkedIn - Details 
Media // Burbank // Content at The Ellen Show - Details 
Fitness // NYC // Product designer at ClassPass - Details 
Media // NYC // Visual designer at Thrive Global - Details
 

🇬🇧

Media // London // Project manager at Reuters - Details 
NGO // London // Digital associate at Malala Fund - Details 
Retail // London // Partnerships manager at LEGO - Details 
NGO // London // Youth advisor at Charityjob - Details 
Internet // London // Marketing at TikTok - Details 
NGO // London // Fundraising at Syria Campaign - Details


🇩🇪

Tourism // Berlin // Content editing at GetYourGuide - Details 
Music // Berlin // Manager at Spotify - Details 
Finance // Berlin // Creative design at Taxfix - Details

 
🗣Share these jobs with your friends:

Something Fun

 for your eyes, mind, and heart. 

📚The grim, necessary optimism of sci-fi author Becky Chambers. Her novels dare to imagine a hopeful future for humanity. And they’re exhilarating.

🐂At only 13 years old, Najiah Knight is the only girl riding bulls in competitions in the US. She is riding bulls that can weigh up to 1,000 pounds. They buck hard, they kick, and they stomp—she has the battle scars to prove it. But Najiah also has a lot of awards and a work ethic that won’t quit.⁠

🎥This film festival has been celebrating and uplifting women storytellers for a decade.

🔮Working undercover for Harry Houdini, the renowned illusionist and escape artist, Rose Mackenberg, a private detective, exposed phony psychics who claimed they could connect people to their dead loved ones. In a career that lasted decades and led her to testify before Congress, she investigated and exposed hundreds of con artists. Mackenberg adopted a variety of disguises, among them the “rustic schoolteacher,” the “credulous servant girl” and the “tipsy consultant.” 

🇪🇬Egyptians adored Isis, divine protector of the dead, for two millennia before her cult spread beyond the Nile to the rest of the Roman Empire.

💡Need a good documentary to watch during our lockdown? NYTimes just released a fascinating new short documentary, “Hysterical Girl”, which uses a feminist lens to re-examine one of Sigmund Freud’s (the founding father of psychoanalysis’) five major psychological case histories — the only one he produced of a female patient. Hysterical Girl reimagines Dora, the name Freud used at the turn of the 20th century to protect his subject’s identity, as a girl today. In the film, she tells her version of events, alongside Freud’s own words. Dora was 17 when her parents brought her to therapy after she accused a family friend of sexual assault. “Please,” Dora’s father asked Freud, “bring her to reason.” During the 11-week treatment, Freud chipped away at the case: Why would you continue to see the man you say assaulted you? Are you out for revenge? Did you secretly want it? A century later, the questions women face in similar circumstances haven’t changed much.

⛵️Travel through time with 21 women explorers who changed the world. 

💒Why we should all be more like the nuns of 1918: The sisters of Philadelphia were lifesavers during the Spanish flu epidemic. They are an inspiration today.

🔭“To discover 1,000 places connected to women’s history, and elevate their stories for everyone to learn and celebrate” is the mission for one of the US’ National Trust for Historic Preservation’s latest projects, Saving Places. Have you encountered any places where women made history? They can be famous or unknown, protected or threatened, existing or lost. No matter their condition or status, these places matter, and they want you to share them with the world. All you have to do is submit a photo along with a short description! 

🍍Food lovers–this one's for you. I just learned about this amazing community of women called the Pineapple Collaborative on a mission to connect and celebrate women who love food. They host awesome events, and offer highly entertaining pictures, videos, and many more treats. 

🧠Brain food: This week we’re switching things up just a little. Each week, I share brain food with ideas, quotes, art, and pretty much anything that's inspiring me. This week, I’d love to hear from you, to help us celebrate and learn from each other, and the beauty of everyday acts of resilience, love, and courage: 

How are you preserving your wellbeing during the lockdowns? Have you adopted any new habits or hobbies? And to what or whom are you grateful for right now?  

I'll share your thoughts in next week’s newsletter (anonymously, too) and you can send them along with any ideas you have on what topics I should write about next to jas.anouna96@gmail.com!


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